Courses-Level-3M

Effective from the Academic Year 2018/2019

Unit Code

Unit Title

Credit Value

Hourly breakdown

Notional

Hours 

Theory

Practical/

Field visit

Independent Learning

Semester 1 & 2

FIS307M2

Research Methods, Scientific Writing and Presentations

2

15

30

105

Semester 1

FIS301M3

Fishery Economics and Marketing

 

3

45

105

150

FIS302M3

Fish Population Dynamics and Stock Assessment

 

3

45

105

150

FIS305M2

Fisheries Practical I (Fishery Economics and Marketing and Fish Population Dynamics and Stock Assessment)

 

2

60

140

200

Sub-Total

8

 

 

 

 

Semester 2

FIS303M3

Fisheries Microbiology

 

3

45

105

150

FIS304M3

Aquatic Pollution and Toxicology

 

3

45

105

150

FIS306M2

Fisheries Practical II  (Fisheries Microbiology and Aquatic Pollution and toxicology)

2

60

140

200

Sub-total

8

 

 

 

 

Total

18

 

 

 

 

Course Title

Fishery Economics and Marketing

Course Code

FIS301M3

Credit Value

3

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Independent Learning

45

105

Objectives:

Provide in-depth knowledge on fishery Economics and Marketing, and fisheries marketing strategies

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO):

·          Discuss the fundamentals of economics in fishery

·          Analyze the role of marketing in fisheries and aquaculture

·          Construct the tools for fishery resource management policies

·          Elaborate fish market channels and value chains

·          Evaluate the production economics in fisheries and aquaculture

Course Contents:

Descriptive bio-economics; Optimal fishing strategies; MEY and fMEY, Total Allowable catch; Surplus yield models, Yield per recruit models, Biomass models, Simulation models; Basic Fishery Economics; Cost – revenue analysis, Basic accounting, banking; Fishery resource management policies; markets, taxes, subsidies, permits, direct controls, distributional effects of fisheries development; Target marketing; Market channels and value chains; Role of marketing in fisheries and aquaculture, markets over space, intra market price relationships, Import and export markets; Price index and consumer preferences.

Teaching and Learning Methods:

Lecture presentation, Group activity, problem solving, tutorial discussion, case studies

Assessment Strategy:

            Theory:           

In – course assessment/s:                                                                               30%

                         End of Course Examination of three hours duration                                   70%

                          (Expected to answer four out of six questions)                

 

References:

  • Engle, C., Aquaculture economics and financing, Ames, Iowa: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.

·         Shyam, S Salim and Biradar, R.S and Pandey, S.K., Fisheries Economics and Marketing – An introduction,  Central Institute of Fisheries Education, Mumbai, 2005.

 

Course Title

Fish Population Dynamics and Stock Assessment

Course Code

FIS302M3

Credit Value

3

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Independent Learning

45

105

Objectives:

Provide holistic knowledge on fish population dynamics, stock assessment and management tools

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO):

·      Outline the objectives and reference points in relation to sustainable fishing

·      Explain the stock enhancement plans and regulations aimed at stock protection

·      Appraise the effect of fishing on marine ecosystems

·      Discuss the biological basis of single species and multiple species models

·      Elaborate the governance of marine fisheries, advantages and disadvantages of different management tools

Course Contents:

Principles of stock assessment and catch predictions; multispecies models, size based models. Theory of life tables. Von Bertalanffy growth parameters. Graphical models. Monte-Carlo simulation model and ECOPATH model. The concept of yield, yield in number and yield in weight, yield per recruit, yield curve. Yield models. The concept of Maximum Sustainable Yield and Maximum Economic Yield. Biological indicators of under-fishing and over-fishing. Growth over-fishing and recruitment overfishing. Eumetric fishing. Open access fisheries. Fisheries regulations. CPUE. Trawl selection and gillnet selection. Analytical models of fish stocks.

Teaching and Learning Methods:

Lecture presentation, Group activity, Recitation oral questions, Class projects, Tutorial discussion, Problem solving sessions and computer labs.

Assessment Strategy:

            Theory:           

In – course assessment/s:                                                                               30%

                         End of Course Examination of three hours duration                                  70%

                          (Expected to answer four out of six questions)                

 

References:

·     Hilborn, R. and Walters, C., Quantitative fisheries stock assessment, Dordrecht: Springer. 2015.

·     Nikolskii, G.V., Fish population dynamics, Oliver and boyd, 2013.

·     Pauly, D., Fish population dynamics in tropical waters: a manual for use with programmable calculators, (Vol. 8). WorldFish. 1984.

Course Title

Fisheries Microbiology

Course Code

FIS303M3

Credit Value

3

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Independent Learning

45

105

Objectives:

Provide factual information on the principles of microbiological techniques, quality assurance system, and its importance as a food safety management system

Intended Learning Outcome:

·      Explain the microbiological principles in fisheries

·      Categorize the diversity of pathogenic microbes of fish and shellfish

·      Discuss the techniques involved in isolation and identification of pathogenic microbes

·      Elaborate the microbiological aspects in fish quality assurance

Course Contents:

Introduction and history of microorganisms in foods. Role and significance of microorganisms in nature and in foods. Sources and types of microorganisms in fish and fishery products.  Factors (intrinsic and extrinsic) affecting the growth and survival of microorganisms in food. Enumeration of microorganisms in food by conventional and rapid techniques.  Microbial principles of fish preservation and processing by application of low temperature, high temperature, drying, irradiation and chemicals. Microbiology and spoilage of fresh, semi processed and processed fish and fishery products. Indicators of microbiological quality of fish and fishery products. Food borne pathogens involved in infective and intoxication type of food poisoning and their occurrence, growth, survival, pathogenicity and prevention. Other biological hazards associated with fish and fishery products- marine toxins-shellfish toxins, scombroid toxins, ciguatera toxins and puffer fish toxins; mycotoxins, parasites and viruses.

Teaching and Learning Methods:

Lecture presentation, Group activity, Recitation oral questions, Class projects, Tutorial discussion

Assessment Strategy:

            Theory:           

In – course assessment/s:                                                                               30%

                         End of Course Examination of three hours duration                                  70%

                          (Expected to answer four out of six questions)                

 

References:

·   Fernandes, R., Microbiology handbook: Fish and Seafood, Leatherhead, U.K.: Leatherhead Pub, 2009.

·   Rhea, F., Microbiology Handbook fish and seafood, Cambridge, CB4 0WF, UK, 2009.

Course Title

Aquatic Pollution and Toxicology

Course Code

FIS304M3

Credit Value

3

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Independent Learning

45

105

Objectives:

Provide in-depth knowledge on toxicological aspects of various pollutants, destructive impacts of various substance, and organic and physical entities on living aquatic life forms

 

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO):

·         Identify the pollutants and ascertaining their points of input into the aquatic ecosystem

·         Analyze physical and chemical speciation of different organic and inorganic pollutants

·         Distinguish acute responses and chronic effects such as teratogenesis, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis

·         Elaborate dose response relationship and behavioral responses to toxicants

Course Contents:

Introduction to Aquatic Pollution and Toxicology; pollutant, sources of pollution; Ecosystems and Ecotoxicology, Water Pollution: Transport and Persistence Sources and Fates of Aquatic Pollutants, Toxicity; Determination of toxicity, Behavioral responses to toxicants, Physiological responses to toxicants Biochemical responses to toxicants, Cellular and Molecular responses to toxicants. Metabolism of toxic substances by aquatic organisms -consequences, synergistic and antagonistic effects; Acute poisons and accumulative poisons; Bioaccumulation and biomagnification; Systemic effects of toxic metals, pesticides and herbicides; Effect of select toxicants on aquatic life and detoxification, Dose-Response Relationships, Toxicity Bioassays

Teaching and Learning Methods:

Lecture presentation, Field work, Group activity, tutorial discussion

Assessment Strategy:

            Theory:           

In – course assessment/s:                                                                               30%

                         End of Course Examination of three hours duration                                  70%

                          (Expected to answer four out of six questions)                

 

References:

·   Rand, G.M. and Petrocelli, S.R., Fundamentals of Aquatic Toxicology, Hemisphere Publishing Corporation, Washington, 1994.

·   Richard, T. D. and David, E. H. The Toxicology of Fishes, CRC press.  2008.

Course Title

Fisheries Practical I

Course Code

FIS305M2

Credit Value

2

Hourly Breakdown

Practical

Independent Learning

60

140

Objectives:

Provide practical skills on fishery economics and marketing, fundamental population parameters and fish population dynamics

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO):

·         Outline the marketing strategy and pricing methods

·         Explain the function of different management techniques and model to guide fish stock management

·         Analyse the components of population dynamics for different fish species

·         Estimate fish stock assessment using fishery dependant and independent survey

·         Evaluate the fundamental population parameters for fishes namely stock abundance, growth, recruitment and mortality

·         Estimate the size of a fish population and perform short and long-term predictions of the effect of changing fishing effort and gear selection by means of age based models

Course Contents:

Socio-economic structure of fishers; survey for capture fisheries economics; catch and effort surveys, market surveys; fisheries cooperative societies and their performance; different management techniques and model to guide fish stock management; Study of length – weight relationship, segregation of stock using direct methods. Study of analytical models: Beverton and Holt model. VBGF, Pauly’s integrated methods, graphical models. Estimation of Z, F and M. estimation of net selectivity coefficient. Fitting of surplus production model: Schaeffer model, Fox model. Study of yield isopleth diagrams. Micro-computer packages ELEFAN, FISAT.

Teaching and Learning Methods:

Recording, Problem solving sessions and computer labs, Models, Poster

Assessment Strategy:

            Practical:         

In – course assessment/s:                                                                               

Spot exam /Recording / Field Report / Field assessment                                 30%

                         End of Course Examination of two hours duration                                    70%                                   

References:

·  Hilborn, R. and Walters, C., Quantitative fisheries stock assessment, Dordrecht: Springer. 2015.

·  Nikolskii, G.V., Fish population dynamics, Oliver and boyd. 2013.

·  Pauly, D. Fish population dynamics in tropical waters: a manual for use with programmable calculators, (Vol. 8). WorldFish., 1984.

·  Simon Jennings, Michel.J.Kaiser, John D.Reynolds. Marine Fisheries Ecology,  Blackwell Publ. 2001.

 

Level

3

Course Title

Fisheries Practical II

Course Code

FIS306M2

Credit Value

2

Hourly Breakdown

Practical

Independent Learning

60

140

Objectives:

Provide practical knowledge and skills on different advanced techniques related to fish microbiology and aquatic pollution and toxicology

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO):

·         Demonstrate the techniques involved in isolation and identification of pathogenic microbes encountered in fishes

·         Classify the diseases in fish and shellfish and their control measures

·         Analyze the point and non-point sources of the aquatic pollution

·         Discuss the techniques available for toxicity assessment

·         Design animal models in predicting and assessing risk to human health

Course Contents:

Sampling and processing of samples for microbiological investigation. Enumeration of microorganisms associated with finfish, shellfish, water and ice. Testing of water for potability. Isolation and identification of pathogenic bacteria associated with fish and fishery products. Biochemical tests for characterization of bacteria.  Molecular methods for the detection of pathogenic microorganisms; Biomagnification of micropollutant, Nutrient behaviour, phytoplankton and algal nuisance; Pollution and its effects on aquatic life, ecological characteristics of polluted waters and methods for maintaining and improving water quality (chemical, mechanical, biological); toxicity bioassays; Aquatic toxicity determination; LC50, EC50, LD50.

Teaching and Learning Methods:

Group activity, Recording, Field trip, Poster, Photographs, use of specimen slides

Assessment Strategy:

 

Practical:        

In – course assessment/s:                                                                               

Spot exam /Recording / Field Report / Field assessment                                 30%

                         End of Course Examination of two hours duration                                    70% 

                     

References:

·      Austin, B., Methods for the microbiological examination of fish and shellfish, Chichester: Ellis Horwood, 1989.

·      Leatherland J., Fish Diseases and Disorders. 2nd Edition. The Association of Learned and Professional Society Publ., 2010.

Course Title

Research Methods, Scientific Writing and Presentations

Course Code

FIS307M2

Credit Value

2

Core/ Elective

Core

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical/Field work

Independent Learning

15

30

55

Objectives

·     Provide the skills in developing research methods, professional writing, communicating with Scientific Journals

·     Enhance the presenting skills of the research findings to the audience. 

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

    Describe different research methods related to Fisheries and Aquaculture

    Organize the findings into constructive scientific writing in order to present them in Scientific Journals

    Discuss different techniques in effective presentation

 

Course Contents

Techniques in sampling and measurement of parameters in fisheries and aquaculture; Design of experiments and surveys; Introduction to questionnaire design; Scientific writing in different types of journals; Techniques in presenting results and reports. Reference styles; Citations, research ethics, Plagiarism, Quantitative and qualitative research.

 

Teaching and Learning Methods

Lecture, group activity, proposal writing, oral presentation, brainstorming small groups, tutorial discussion

Assessment Strategy

           

                          In – course assessment/s:                                                                                 30%

                         End of Course Examination                                                                 70%            

References

       Novikov, A.M.N. and Dimitry, A., 2019. Research Methodology: from philosophy of science to research design. CRC Press.

       Nair, P.K.R. and Nair, V.D., 2014. Scientific Writing and Communication in Agriculture and Natural Resources, 1st ed. 2014. ed. Springer International Publishing : Imprint: Springer, Cham.

Course

Code

Course title

 

Resource Persons

FIS301M3

Fishery Economics and Marketing

 

Dr. Udeni Edirisinghe

Mr.N.Ragavan

Mr. Chintaka Perera

FIS302M3

Fish Population Dynamics and Stock Assessment

 

Prof. Mrs. S.Kuganathan

Dr. W.A.H.P. Guruge

FIS303M3

Fisheries Microbiology

 

Dr. Udeni Edirisinghe

Mrs.S.Sathyaruban

Mr. Chintaka Perera

FIS304M3

Aquatic Pollution and Toxicology

 

Prof. Mrs. S.Kuganathan

Mr.K.Gunaalan

FIS305M2

Fisheries Practical I (Fishery Economics and Marketing and Fish Population Dynamics and Stock Assessment)

 

Prof. Mrs. S.Kuganathan

Mrs.S.Sathyaruban

Mr. Chintaka Perera

Dr. W.A.H.P. Guruge

FIS306M2

Fisheries Practical II  (Fisheries Microbiology and Aquatic Pollution and toxicology)

 

Prof. Mrs. S.Kuganathan

Mrs.S.Sathyaruban

Mr. Chintaka Perera Mr.K.Gunaalan

FIS307M2

In Field Training 

 

Prof. Mrs. S.Kuganathan

Mrs.S.Sathyaruban